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The Russian approach to climate change

Published 07th November 2009 - 5 comments - 1574 views -

In a fit of what borders on despair, Time magazine reports: "Russia doesn't seem to care two bits about global warming, and it's not hard to see why. Most Russians would probably be happy if the country was a little warmer...

...To say that Russia is hesitant about tackling climate change is putting it mildly. The last time the world tried to get the country's cooperation on the issue was in 1997, during negotiations for the Kyoto Protocol … Because Russia is the world's third largest source of emissions after the U.S. and China, the accord would have failed without it. So the treaty was written in a way that would allow Russia to keep polluting as much as it wanted and grant the country billions of dollars in emissions allowances to sell to other countries that needed to meet their Kyoto commitments.

As a U.N. official who participated in the talks put it, 'Russia got the sweetest deal: free money, no restrictions.'"

Wonder how that happened, then? And isn't it funny how much of a free ride Russia gets from environmentalists. There's no end of beating up on the USA in green circles and on blogs like this, but we hear nary a word about Putin & Co. Guess nobody wants to be on the wrong side of the ex-KGB man because those who do tend to have problems getting life insurance. Still, one would think that those interested in the appearance of balance would hold Moscow's toes to the fire now and then. Meanwhile, our friends in Brussels are wondering what to do with the "billions of unused pollution credits accumulated by Russia, Ukraine and other former communist states of Eastern Europe under the Kyoto Protocol."

Is the Mafia running this racket?

 

Category: Polar Regions, | Tags: russia, putin, carbon, racket, mafia,



Comments

Daniel Nylin Nilsson on 07th November 2009:

I guess the beating up of the US is a sign of democracy… I douubt anyone feels it has any impact critizising Putin and Co. Moreover, his climate negligence is hardly the biggest problem.

Sweden is a nice country by the way, our government loves to hate and fear Russia, but didn’t have anything against the North Stream pipeline in the baltic sea. I guess noone dares to create real problems with the guy, after all the gives give us the oil for he cars we drive…

Andreas on 09th November 2009:

This is what Russian energy expert Maria Belowa says about renewables in Russia: http://climatechange.thinkaboutit.eu/think2/post/alternative_energy_resources_play_minor_role_in_russia

icanhulkout on 11th November 2009:

Stop complaining about what poorer countries do until they reach the level of income you enjoy. Should they be asked to starve so you can consume more? Russia is not 3rd anyway. EU is. I doubt the masses of unemployed youth in the eastern part have much to do with any of it either.

BTW, if Putin’s government fell, it would not be replaced by a liberal one. Think about that.

Eamonn Fitzgerald on 11th November 2009:

I am not “complaining” about poor countries. And Russia, with its huge reserves of oil and gas and minerals, is not exactly a “poor” country. But if you want to hear about poverty, I could tell you a bit about it becasue I grew up on a small farm in the south-west of Ireland and all we had at that time was a subsistence economy. No money! Food, yes, but plenty of oppressive and awful poverty.

Daniel Nylin Nilsson on 11th November 2009:

“if Putin’s government fell, it would not be replaced by a liberal one” - I fear you are right about this.

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