TH!NK post

Pictures on shrinking Dead Sea from the Israeli side

Published 20th October 2010 - 10 comments - 2918 views -

Dead Sea is dying it is obvious as we could learn it also from the Jordanian blogger fellow.

When I was first time in Israel (1992) Dead Sea level was almost at the road. For now it is kms far.

Dead Sea

Pictures showing the shrinkage from the Israeli side.

Year by year the water faster and faster running back.

 Shrinking Dead Sea

 Shrinking Dead Sea

Dead Sea is a very sad, obvious indicator of Climate Change.

Shrinking Dead Sea

I have taken these pictures in 2008-2009,

so I can imagine that situation is getting even worst for now.

Shrinking Dead Sea

 Shrinking Dead Sea

Category: Greenhouse Gases, | Tags:



Comments

Hussam Hussein on 21st October 2010:

Hi Laszlo!

Thanks for the pictures! In my post that you mentioned http://climatechange.thinkaboutit.eu/think4/post/the_dead_sea_is_dying my pictures showed the effects of the shrinking of the Dead Sea: the sinkholes. So it’s cool to see in your pictures the shrinking of the Dead Sea smile
Great that also you raised this specific case.

Hussam Hussein on 21st October 2010:

Dear Laci,

I’m indeed aware of that, that’s why I talked about the Jordan River and the Dead Sea issues. The video i posted, for instance, is an interview to an Israeli rep. of the environmental NGO Friends of the Earth Middle East, an Israeli-Jordanian-Palestinian NGO that brings together Israeli, Jordanian, and Palestinian environmentalists that share the importance of acting together in order to save the Jordan River and the Dead Sea. Therefore common problems, but also common solutions! smile

Hussam Hussein on 27th October 2010:

Justin,

thanks for highlighting the different reasons for that the Dead Sea is shrinking. You can find more specific info in my posts: http://climatechange.thinkaboutit.eu/think4/post/climate_change_jordan_valley_1_-_0 and http://climatechange.thinkaboutit.eu/think4/post/the_dead_sea_is_dying
Of course, the diversion of the Jordan River resources is one of the main reasons for the shrinking of the Dead Sea, but the lower precipitation are also contributing negatively to this situation.

Hussam Hussein on 28th October 2010:

Hi Justin. Thanks for your reply. You raised interesting and important positive aspects of the prospected canal, including the hydroelectric energy that it will produce and the desalinization of some water resources. However, according to the NGO Friends of the Earth Middle East, there are some issue on that people could be concerned:
The building of this water conveyance raises many questions, such as:

1. What impact will the pumping of vast quantities of seawater out of the Gulf of Aqaba have on the fragile coral reefs in this area?

2. What changes will occur to the natural landscape of the Arava Valley both during the construction of the proposed 110 mile water conveyance and after?

3. What will happen when the Dead Sea is ‘filled up’ and can no longer receive desalination brine generated from the desalination activities of the project?

4. How will the threat posed by gypsum and other microorganism growth from the mixing of Red Sea and Dead Sea waters be addressed? Will toxic odours be released as a result of the mixing of the two seas, scaring away tourists?

5. Will control over pumping, desalinated water production, and distribution be handed over to private, for-profit business concerns? If so, what kinds of guarantees exist to protect the public’s interests?

6. What kinds of solutions will be found for silt and potential leakage of water during transport?

7. Will changing the chemical composition of the Dead Sea result in loss of its unique characteristics? In particular, the health benefits that lead to tourism?

8. Will man made lakes and other infrastructures be built as part of the project in the Arava Valley?

9. Will decisions regarding this project be made in consultation with environmental NGO’s, local communities, and experts not on the payroll of governments and business concerns?

10. Should a project that raises such serious environmental concerns move forward without a thorough independent assessment of possible alternatives such as the rehabilitation of the Jordan River to arrest the decline of the Dead Sea, as required by World Bank guidelines?

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