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Curation after Copenhagen

Published 16th November 2009 - 2 comments - 646 views -

We've fought over the facts and we've argued about the science, but now it's time to move on. When we regroup to thrash out the treaty that one day might be I hope we'll be able to agree on some basic facts and to that end I am introducing an up-and-coming concept called "digital curation".

In essence, digital curation a response to the flood of data that we're now being subjected to. Facebook and Twitter lists are one example of digital curation; the Posterous and Tumblr platforms, which allow groups of people to organize around shared interests are others, while Mahalo has potential, too.

A useful example is provided by IBM in its use of Tumblr to curate ideas for "a smarter planet". This could be the role model for some of us here to curate the essential resources sceptics need to argue against the Gore-Monbiot axis, or for the pro-Kyoto side to curate the needed information to make the case for a comprehensive treaty.

So, instead of wasting time and tears over what might have been let's get going with the next phase of the, er, battle. All we need now is get the EJC or some similar generous institution to support the curation concept. Properly done, it would be a worthy legacy of this blogging project.

Category: International Action, | Tags: tumblr, ibm, digital curation,



Comments

Benno Hansen on 16th November 2009:

Not really sure what you’re suggesting but I tried a bunch of those thingies… Twitter, StumbleUpon, etc… one of them I’m stuck on: Diigo. Rather than doing fancy stuff it does the most obvious: Gives you the ability to make yellow highlights in texts online.

Eamonn Fitzgerald on 16th November 2009:

Benno, sorry for not making myself clearer. I just thought that “a smarter planet” offers us an example of how to curate/list resources on the climate change debate and, as we’ve seen here, there is such confusion about the numbers and the science that an ongoing, curated resource of such data would be a worthwhile project.

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